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New Videos: New Videos from the Library of Congress, July 5
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Watch these videos just added to the Library of Congress website. 

Chao Tian & Tom Teasley

Tom and Chao formed the musical duo Dong Xi ("East and West") in 2018. They use improvisation to create an effective musical dialogue between East and West, and are dedicated to bridging the gap between China and the United States with music. They received the 2019 Washington Area Music Award (Wammie) for Best World Music Group and were nominated for Outstanding Sound Design at the 2020 Helen Hayes Award.

New Findings in the Wanda Landowska and Denise Restout Papers

Wanda Landowska waited until the bombs were in close range before she fled her home outside of Paris on June 10, 1940, leaving behind her rare musical instruments and most of her vast music library, all of which were confiscated by the Nazi Sonderstab Musik. 

Behind the Books: A Day in the Life at the Library of Congress with Dani Thurber

Behind the Books is a video series dedicated to providing a snapshot of the experience of members at the Library of Congress. Here, we have Dani Thurber sharing her experience as a Reference Librarian in the Hispanic Reading Room.

Behind the Books: A Day in the Life at the Library of Congress with Elmer Eusman

Behind the Books is a video series dedicated to providing a snapshot of the experience of members at the Library of Congress. In this video, Elmer Eusman shares his experience as a Chief of the Conservation Division.

Behind the Books: A Day in the Life at the Library of Congress with Angela Kinney

Behind the Books is a video series dedicated to providing a snapshot of the experience of members at the Library of Congress. In this video, Angela Kinney shares her experience as a Chief of the African, Latin American, & Western European Division.

2022 Kluge Prize Announcement

Historian George Chauncey will receive the 2022 John W. Kluge Prize for Achievement in the Study of Humanity. Chauncey is the DeWitt Clinton Professor of American History at Columbia University, a position he has held since 2017, and he directs the Columbia Research Institute on the Global History of Sexualities.


June News from the Library of Congress
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News from the Library of Congress

Celebrating Pride Month, Juneteenth, Summer Movies and More


New Videos: New Videos from the Library of Congress, June 14
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Watch these videos just added to the Library of Congress website. 

Patsy Takemoto Mink: First Woman of Color in Congress

In honor of Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage month, Judy Tzu-Chun Wu and Gwendolyn Mink join us to discuss their new biography of Congresswoman Mink, "Fierce and Fearless: Patsy Takemoto Mink, First Woman of Color in Congress".

Pamyua

The American Folklife Center presents the ensemble Pamyua, who performs traditional Inuit (Yup'ik) drum-songs from Alaska with a distinct and unique American sound.

 

The Fires of Philadelphia

Author Zachary M. Schrag discusses his book "The Fires of Philadelphia: Citizen Soldiers, Nativists, and the 1844 Riots Over the Soul of a Nation."

Live! at the Library: Honoring Memorial Day

Bob Regan is a Grammy nominated, Dove Award nominated, and Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame nominated songwriter from Nashville, TN. In 2012, Regan founded Operation Song, a non-profit with the mission to "empower veterans, active-duty military, and their families to tell their stories through the process of songwriting." To date, over 1100 songs have been written in the program with veterans of WWII to Afghanistan.

A Conversation with Abdulrazak Gurnah, Nobel Prize winner in Literature 2021

Tune in for a conversation with Abdulrazak Gurnah, Tanzanian-born novelist and academic, and also the Nobel Prize winner in Literature 2021. The Conversations with African Poets and Writers series presents interviews with current African diaspora writers committed to the literature of continental and diasporic Africa and readings from their written works.


New Videos from the Library of Congress, May 24
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ARC Ensemble: Artists of the Royal Conservatory of Music, Canada

The ARC Ensemble musicians (Artists of the Royal Conservatory of Music, Canada) are considered among Canada's leading cultural ambassadors. Its 20-year history of excellent concerts and superbly-produced recordings documents the ensemble's focus on the research and rediscovery of music suppressed and marginalized under the 20th century's repressive regimes.

 

Ziering-Conlon Initiative for Recovered Voices from The Colburn School

The Colburn School's Ziering-Conlon Initiative for Recovered Voices encourages the performance and awareness of music by composers suppressed during the years of the Nazi regime in Europe. Artistic Director James Conlon conducts the school's orchestra in a significant work by the Austrian composer Franz Schreker, known in the early 20th century primarily for his operas.

 

Homegrown: Herb Ohta, Jr., Hawaiian Ukulele Master

Mega songwriter Desmond Child ("Livin' on a Prayer," "You Give Love a Bad Name," "Dude Looks Like a Lady") tells the Library about writing one of his biggest hits, "Livin' La Vida Loca," in the late 1990s, when record executives were afraid Americans wouldn't know what "la vida loca" meant. The song was inducted into the 2022 class of the National Recording Registry.

 

Joy Jumps from the Page

This event is part of the 12th annual Jonah S. Eskin Memorial Program, a feature supported by the Jonah S. Eskin Memorial Fund of the Library of Congress. The fund was established to honor the late son of Marcia and Barnet Eskin.

 

Before the Religious Right

Join the Kluge Center for a discussion with Gene Zubovich who explains the important role of liberal Protestants in the battles over poverty, segregation, and U.S. foreign relations in a global context.

 

Mary Lou Williams: Jazz, Race, Gender, and Iconography

Reporter, "Down Beat" columnist, author of "The Golden Age of Jazz" (1979), and photographer William P. Gottlieb (1917-2006) pioneered jazz iconography and shaped the American public's view of jazz. With access to Black jazz musicians in their work environments of nightclubs and concert halls and, in some cases, the private realms of these musicians' homes, Gottlieb documented New York's jazz scene during a ten-year period from 1938 to 1948. His photographs of jazz pianist-composer Mary Lou Williams (1910-1981) are exemplars of jazz iconography and serve as a case study of how Gottlieb depicted jazz musicians to the mainstream White public through his camera lens. Analysis of these photographs provide insight into the intersections of race, gender, and the politics of Jim Crow (racial segregation) with jazz.

 

Damon Galgut, Winner of the 2021 Booker Prize

Watch a conversation with South African novelist and playwright Damon Galgut in celebration of Africa Month. Galgut won the 2021 Booker Prize for his ninth novel "The Promise," a fictional account of a white South African family living on a farm outside Pretoria during the waning days of apartheid. Using humor to broach difficult subjects, the novel was praised by the Booker Prize judges for offering an "unambiguous commentary on the history of South Africa and of humanity itself."

 


May News from the Library of Congress
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News from the Library of Congress

Live! at the Library, May Heritage Months, NewA Concerts from the Library of CongressA and More


New Videos from the Library of Congress, April 26
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Introduction to the Neil Simon Collection

The Library of Congress is thrilled to announce the acquisition of the Neil Simon Collection - the papers and other materials from the most successful American playwright in history. A playwright, screenwriter, librettist, and television writer, among Simon's many classic works are: "Barefoot in the Park", "Sweet Charity", "The Odd Couple", "The Sunshine Boys", "The Heartbreak Kid", "The Goodbye Girl", "Brighton Beach Memoirs", and his Pulitzer Prize winning "Lost in Yonkers". The Neil Simon Collection is rich in hundreds of scripts for dozens of titles, many handwritten drafts. Here you'll see a few sample highlights of items from the collection.

Alicia Keys: National Recording Registry 2022

Alicia Keys tells the Library that her street nickname in Harlem was "Hit a High Note" because her neighbors could her her belting out the songs for her debut album, "Songs in A Minor," in her tiny apartment "studio." The album was inducted into the 2022 class of the National Recording Registry.

Steve Perry: National Recording Registry 2022

Former Journey lead singer Steve Perry tells the Library the story behind the writing of "Don't Stop Believin'" one late night in Detroit after a concert. The song was inducted into the 2022 class of the National Recording Registry.

Desmond Child: National Recording Registry 2022

Mega songwriter Desmond Child ("Livin' on a Prayer," "You Give Love a Bad Name," "Dude Looks Like a Lady") tells the Library about writing one of his biggest hits, "Livin' La Vida Loca," in the late 1990s, when record executives were afraid Americans wouldn't know what "la vida loca" meant. The song was inducted into the 2022 class of the National Recording Registry.

Marc Maron: National Recording Registry 2022

Comedian and influential podcast host Marc Maron tells the Library about his seminal 2010 interview with comedian Robin Williams, in which the star talked movingly about his insecurities and thoughts of suicide. The podcast was inducted into the 2022 class of the National Recording Registry.

Homegrown: Herb Ohta, Jr., Hawaiian Ukulele Master

The American Folklife Center presents international recording artist Herb Ohta, Jr. - one of today's most prolific ukulele masters. Influenced by Jazz, R&B, Latin and Brazilian music, as well as traditional Hawaiian sounds, he puts his stamp on Hawaiian music by pushing the limits of tone and technique on this beautiful instrument.

The Kluge Center hosts a conversation with Tamika Y. Nunley on her latest book, "At the Threshold of Liberty: Women, Slavery, and Shifting Identities in Washington, D.C". Nunley discusses the stories of Black women in D.C. navigating lives of slavery within a city founded upon the symbolism of liberty.

Ricky Riccardi takes viewers through a multimedia journey of the music that helped shape Louis Armstrong's style and transformed him into one of the most influential musicians of the 20th century.

Homegrown: Kongero, Swedish Folk'appella

Kongero is a Swedish vocal group, consisting of four women who sing folksongs: Lotta Andersson, Emma Björling, Sofia Hultqvist Kott, and Anna Wikénius. Kongero was formed in 2005 when the original members met at a Nordic folk music conference. Since 2005, they have performed their polyphonic a cappella folk music (which they have dubbed Folk'appella) all over Europe, Asia, and the Americas, singing in concerts and leading workshops in traditional Swedish vocal music and vocal harmonies.

 


April News from the Library of Congress
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News from the Library of Congress

National Recording Registry Inducts Music from Alicia Keys, Ricky Martin, Journey and More in 2022

nrr20222

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden named 25 recordings as audio treasures worthy of preservation for all time based on their cultural, historical or aesthetic importance in the nationas recorded sound heritage.

Alicia Keysa debut album aSongs in A Minor,a Ricky Martinas aLivina La Vida Locaa and Journeyas aDonat Stop Believina are some of the unforgettable sounds of the nationas history and culture joining the National Recording Registry of the Library of Congress. The 2022 class includes important inductions of hip-hop and Latin music, including recordings by Linda Ronstadt, A Tribe Called Quest, Wu-Tang Clan and Buena Vista Social Club.

Learn more about the 2022 National Recording Registry.



New Videos from the Library of Congress, April 5
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Lionel Richie in Conversation with Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden

In honor of the 2022 Gershwin Prize, join us for a live conversation with Lionel Richie and Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden.

Imani Winds with the Catalyst Quartet, Program II

The Catalyst Quartet, one of America's great string quartets, has been adding new and established works by under-represented voices to the repertoire through commissions and advocacy for over a decade. This performance begins with three such works - the "Fantasiestücke" of Samuel Coleridge-Taylor, Florence Price's "Five Folksongs in Counterpoint", and Coleridge-Taylor Perkinson's String Quartet entitled "Calvary". In a special collaboration, Catalyst Quartet will be joined by the Imani Winds in a performance of Jessie Montgomery's nonet "Sergeant McCauley".

Watch a conversation with the Catalyst String Quartet for a discussion on their wide-ranging activities as a quartet and the program they recorded for the Library.

Castalian String Quartet

After a string of significant pre-pandemic accolades that included a Borletti-Buitoni Trust Fellowship and the title of 2019 Royal Philharmonic Society Young Artist of the Year, the Castalian String Quartet returns to the stage to show audiences why this is such a special group. Taking a break from their residency at Oxford University, the Castalians showcase some of the most powerful music for quartet penned by Mozart, Hensel and Schubert.

Conversation with Mark Padmore and Mitsuko Uchida

French-American harpsichordist Justin Taylor talks about his recital titled "Fandango", a program of sonatas by Domenico Scarlatti and Antonio Soler. Taylor discusses aspects of the vibrant, cosmopolitan European musical culture that influenced both composers, including the world of Italian opera coloring Scarlatti's dramatic, operatic writing for the keyboard. 

 


March News from the Library of Congress
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News from the Library of Congress

Women's History Month, Gershwin Prize Award & More

womenshistorymonth

Join the Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in commemorating and encouraging the study, observance and celebration of the vital role of women in American history.

Visit our joint web portal highlighting collections, resources and events: womenshistorymonth.gov



March News from the Library of Congress
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News from the Library of Congress

Women's History Month, Gershwin Prize Award & More

womenshistorymonth

Join the Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in commemorating and encouraging the study, observance and celebration of the vital role of women in American history.

Visit our joint web portal highlighting collections, resources and events: womenshistorymonth.gov



New Videos from the Library of Congress, March 15
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Conversation with Tido Visser, Netherlands Chamber Choir

Join us for a conversation with the Netherlands Chamber Choir. The choir is known not only for impeccable performances of traditional repertoire but for pathbreaking projects that expand the boundaries of choral literature.

Orlando di Lasso's "Lagrime di San Pietro" (Tears of St. Peter) stands at the summit of Renaissance polyphonic composition. A monument of the choral literature, this somber tapestry of 20 madrigals and a concluding motet tells the story of the betrayal of Jesus Christ by Saint Peter. The Netherlands Chamber Choir's vision of the work creates a riveting central focus for a dancer in the role of the saint. 

I Am Not Invisible 3.0

Marking International Women's Day, the Library of Congress Veterans History Project and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Center for Women Veterans sponsored this virtual panel, which explored the challenges women veterans face, the communities they represent and how we can all be better advocates.

Conversation with Justin Taylor, Harpsichordist

French-American harpsichordist Justin Taylor talks about his recital titled "Fandango", a program of sonatas by Domenico Scarlatti and Antonio Soler. Taylor discusses aspects of the vibrant, cosmopolitan European musical culture that influenced both composers, including the world of Italian opera coloring Scarlatti's dramatic, operatic writing for the keyboard. 

Justin Taylor, Harpsichord

An impressive concert from the gifted young French-American harpsichordist Justin Taylor pairs sonatas by Domenico Scarlatti and his admirer and disciple Antonio Soler. His technical command and thoughtful perceptions of form and structure highlight intriguing hints of modernism from both composers. 

Pillars of Democracy: The Military

Join the John W. Kluge Center, the American Enterprise Institute, and the Brookings Institution for a conversation exploring how America sees its military today.


February News from the Library of Congress
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News from the Library of Congress

Black History Month, Coronavirus Web Archive Collection & More

bhm

The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the generations of African Americans who struggled with adversity to achieve full citizenship in American society. Visit this joint web portal highlighting collections, resources and events: blackhistorymonth.gov


Programs Honor Black History Month at the Library of Congress

The Library of Congress is holding several virtual events throughout February to share discoveries and stories around Black History Month. For visitors to the Libraryas Jefferson Building, the exhibition aRosa Parks: In Her Own Wordsa remains on view.

Learn more.


New Videos from the Library of Congress, February 1
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Conversation with Stephen Sondheim

These interviews with Stephen Sondheim were conducted in his New York home for six-and-a-half hours over three days in 1997. With his music manuscripts at hand, they are a deep dive into his compositional process, though the conversation is wide-ranging, touching on many aspects of Sondheim's career and craft.

The interview series, "Ayiti Re-imagined: The First Black Sovereign Nation" will serve as a companion to a libguide being produced to draw public attention to the rich resources available for scholars on Haiti, centralize the information online, and broaden awareness of Afro-Caribbean materials in the Library of Congress's collections. This libguide and webcast will serve as resources that connect the Library with an emerging audience discussing Haiti's history, its representation in the media, and its positive impact on black sovereignty in the Americas.

Building Africana Collections and Connecting to Researchers, with James Armstrong

Join us for an interview with James Armstrong, who was the Field Director of the Library of Congress Nairobi Office from 1977-90; and subsequently of the Offices in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Islamabad, Pakistan; and Jakarta, Indonesia from 1992 through 2005.

Paganini and Maia Bang Hohn

Melissa Wertheimer presents and discusses items from the Library's Paganini collection. This talk also includes information on the collection items from the violin pedagogue Maia Bang Hohn.

From the Vaults: New Videos

In this segment of From the Vaults, we discuss a landmark document in American history, John Dunlap's printing of the Declaration of Independence on the night of July 4, 1776. On the morning of July 5, printed copies of the Declaration were dispatched by members of Congress to various assemblies as well as to the commanders of Continental troops. We also discuss the formation of this foundational document, and how it arrived at the Library of Congress.

In this segment of From the Vaults, Amanda Zimmerman and Stephanie Stillo discuss how the Aramont Library led them to the Black Sun Press, an early twentieth-century publishing venture dedicated to the early works of post-war, "Lost Generation" authors.

In this segment of From the Vaults, we examine early twentieth-century Sangorski & Sutcliffe bindings in the Aramont Library. This webinar explores everything from leather bound gentlemen's bindings to an exquisitely bejeweled "Raven Binding" in the Aramont Library.

Conversation with Bennet Konesi - Work Songs From Maine
Brother Arnold Hadd, one of those members, actively carries on the 200-plus-year oral tradition of singing Shaker songs. Brother Arnold has been collaborating with American composer Kevin Siegfried, whose choral arrangements of Shaker songs are frequently performed by modern vocal ensembles. 

 

The Soul of Black Identity: Artist Interviews of the Post-Soul Era

This collection presents more than 75 interviews in which leading figures in music, theater, film and television, dance, literature, comedy, and the visual arts discuss their careers and identities as Black artists.

WHUT Collection

The WHUT Collection includes nearly 250 programs and segments from the Emmy Award-winning WHUT-TV public television station, located in Washington, D.C., on the campus of Howard University. WHUT, earlier known as WHMM-TV, was the first public broadcasting station to be licensed and operated by a historically Black college or university. 


January News from the Library of Congress
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News from the Library of Congress

Lionel Richie, the Kitchen Sisters, New Online Collections & More


New Videos from the Library of Congress, December 28
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Mark Hamill reflects on the success and cultural phenomenon of "Star Wars: Return of the Jedi" (1983), newly added to the National Film Registry in the Library of Congress.

Phillip Kass is an expert writer and appraiser about fine classic stringed instruments and bows. In this lecture he gives the background and the history on how the Library of Congress acquired its Stradivari instruments.

Calidore String Quartet

Hear the Calidore String Quartet perform on the Library's Stradivari instruments in a program of musical gold! Praised for the depth and polish of their interpretations, the Calidore will reveal Haydn's classical perfection, Brahms's romantic mastery, and Mendelssohn's passion and intensity while the harmonies still ring in your ears and reverberate in your heart.

Bria Skonberg Educational Videos

British Columbia-born jazz trumpeter, vocalist and composer Bria Skonberg shares professional techniques for beginners.

The Imani Winds, one of the world's great wind quintets, has been adding new works by under-represented voices to the repertoire for this unique ensemble through commissions and advocacy for over two decades. In this educational video, the Imani Winds introduces the listener to the instruments in the quintet.
With an artistic legacy spanning more than eight decades, the Netherlands Chamber Choir has won admiration for its superb interpretations of masterworks, but also for powerful, provocative original programs that defy the boundaries of traditional choral concerts. This video offers a stunning, joyous performance of J.S. Bach's Christmas Oratorio.

Nowas Your Chance: Join the Friends of Library
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Thank you for subscribing to our email bulletin services! We value your interest in the Library’s programs and services and appreciate this opportunity to connect with you.

As you finalize your year-end giving plans, please take one more opportunity to connect and consider a tax-deductible donation to the Library of Congress. You will become an inaugural member of Friends of the Library of Congress.

As a Friend of the Library, you will join a growing philanthropic community that helps protect, preserve and diversify our nation's cultural record. And you will have unique, member-only opportunities to engage virtually and in person with the collections, curators and other Friends during the coming New Year.

If you’ve joined our new Friends program, thank you very much! And if you haven’t, here’s how you can learn more about Friends of the Library of Congress and join today!

Friends of the Library of Congress logo

 


December News from the Library of Congress
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News from the Library of Congress

2021 National Film Registry, Latinos in Public Media & More


New Videos from the Library of Congress, November 23
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Drawing on recordings, reviews, photographs, sheet music and materials in the Library's ASCAP Foundation Collection, this lecture argues that the 1940 ASCAP concert sheds new light on the issues of mass culture and radio, protest, race and gender at this reaffirmation of the American popular music canon in the final years before involvement in World War II.

"Mapping Ourselves: Exploring the 2020 Census" is a part of the international GIS Day events that take place at research institutions and universities around the globe. The Library of Congress has hosted GIS Day events for more than a decade. The programs always revolve around a specific current policy issue in which GIS is playing an important role. Last year the event centered on the Mapping of the COVID-19 pandemic. This year we will look at the science of the use of the 2020 Census.

Listen to members of Congress read from their favorite books for young people in "Read Around the States." Each video includes an interview with the author, in association with an affiliate of the Library of Congress Center for the Book. Rep. Sean Casten of Illinois reads from "Iggy Peck, Architect" by Andrea Beaty.

Zuill Bailey and Bryan Wallick

Grammy Award-winning, Zuill Bailey and pianist Bryan Wallick come to the Library for a virtual cello recital. The program includes music of Mendelssohn, Debussy, Lukas Foss and Rachmaninoff.

From The Vault

In this segment of From the Vaults, Amanda Zimmerman addresses some curious manuscripts in the Harry Houdini Collection in the Rare Book and Special Collections Division. The Houndini collection contains many strange and intriguing materials, making up what Houdini himself referred to as one of the largest libraries in the world on psychic phenomena, Spiritualism, magic, witchcraft, demonology, evil spirits, etc., some of the material going back as far as 1489. 

In this segment of From the Vaults, we continue to explore treasures from the Aramont Library. Constellations is series of 23 gouache paintings completed by Joan Miró between the turbulent years of 1939 and 1941. When the war was over, the Constellations series was exhibited by Miró's dealer Pierre Matisse (son of Henri Matisse) in New York. 

In this segment of From the Vaults, we continue to explore treasures from the Aramont Library. Constellations is series of 23 gouache paintings completed by Joan Miró between the turbulent years of 1939 and 1941. When the war was over, the Constellations series was exhibited by Miró's dealer Pierre Matisse (son of Henri Matisse) in New York. 

In this segment of From the Vaults, we discuss The International Mark Twain Society. The Society was founded in 1930 by Cyril Clemens as a social and literary discussion group, and later sent its book collection to the Library of Congress to form a Society collection in the Rare Book & Special Collections Division. The collection encompasses books published between the late 19th century and the late 1950s, and includes works in Irish, French, Finnish, Spanish, Swedish, Italian, German, and Czech.


November News from the Library of Congress
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News from the Library of Congress

Native American Heritage Month, Ken Burns Prize, & More!


Join the Friends of the Library of Congress
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For more than 200 years, the Library of Congress has collected, preserved and protected our national record for your use now. To write a book, to start a business, to research your family genealogy, to understand our shared history. The Library is yours. 

And, there is no time like now to join the Friends of the Library of Congress to help preserve this country’s enduring culture and spirit for generations to come. Join now and become an inaugural member. 

As an inaugural member, you will have distinctive opportunities to explore the marvels of the Library’s collections and enjoy engaging with our curators and archivists and librarians. 

And, as a part of this important philanthropic community, you will leave a lasting mark on the nation’s Library. From helping to diversify the Library’s collections to supporting public exhibitions and programs, the impact of becoming a Friend will last for generations.  

Learn more about Friends of the Library of Congress and the benefits of becoming a member.

And join us as an inaugural member today!

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New Videos from the Library of Congress, November 2
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To kick off Native American Heritage Month, Joy Harjo, the first Native American U.S. Poet Laureate, joins Deb Haaland, the first Native American cabinet secretary, in a conversation with Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden.

This year our annual Founder's Day concert honoring Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge offers something remarkable: a collaboration between the fearless Third Coast Percussion, electronic music producer/composer Jlin and Movement Art Is in a composed sequence entitled "Metamorphosis," featuring dance and music by Glass, Jlin and Tyondai Braxton. 

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden and Ken Burns announced the 2021 Library of Congress Lavine/Ken Burns Prize for Film winner and runner-up at a virtual awards ceremony that featured a roundtable discussion focusing on the acclaimed documentary, "John Lewis: Good Trouble," directed by award-winning filmmaker Dawn Porter in conversation with Dr. Hayden, Burns and moderator Yamiche Alcindor of the PBS Newshour.

Leif Ove Andsnes

The extraordinary Norwegian pianist Leif Ove Andsnes brings his illuminating artistic vision to our series for an intimate recital. Taking a break from his most recent Mozart collaboration with the Mahler Chamber Orchestra, Andsnes brings together the music of Beethoven - the "Pathétique" sonata - and a selection of miniatures by Grieg and DvoAák.

Augustin Hadelich

Violinist Augustin Hadelich plays with an undeniable maturity beyond his years and an artistry reminiscent of classical music's Golden Age. Named Musical America's Instrumentalist of the Year in 2018, Hadelich has consistently established himself as a performer of poise and virtuosity.


New Videos from the Library of Congress, October 19
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Full of energy, talent, and charisma, Havana-born jazz vocalist and composer Daymé Arocena comes to the Library to enchant her audience with her rich and powerful vocals. In a conversation with Library staff, she related the behind-the-scenes story about recording the concert from Canada while her band was in Havana. Finally, she shared her experience in a series of educational videos.

Tchaikovsky & His Poets

A sumptuous recital by an all-star trio paints an intimate composer portrait, in performances of mesmerizing intensity. This masterly presentation of Tchaikovsky songs is interwoven with readings of poems from Alexander Pushkin, Afanasy Fet and Mikhail Lermontov, and letters to the composer's brother Modest and patron Nadezhda von Meck. 

The Maratón de Poesía/Poetry Marathon is a trailblazing event in the United States that brings together recognized Hispanic poets, from the United States and abroad, to share their work with the local poetry community. The aratón kicks-off virtually at the Library of Congress with a poetry reading by all participating poets and a conversation to follow.

A Fiddler's Tale

Igor Stravinsky's iconic work L'Histoire du soldat is based on the eternal story of a young man who sells his soul to the devil, achieving fame and fortune, but losing everything when the devil calls in the debt. 

Conversation with Wynton Marsalis

Kazem Abdullah leads a conversation with Jazz at Lincoln Center Artistic Director Wynton Marsalis. They discuss his work, "A Fiddler's Tale" and his collaboration and work with Stanley Crouch.


New Videos from the Library of Congress, October 5
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Open a Book, Open the World: 2021 National Book Festival

Watch various author talks from this year’s National Book Festival. 

2021 National Book Festival: Children

2021 National Book Festival: Teen

2021 National Book Festival: Fiction 

2021 National Book Festival: Science

2021 National Book Festival: Lifestyle

2021 National Book Festival: Current Events

2021 National Book Festival: History & Biography 

2021 National Book Festival: Poetry and Prose

The American Folklife Center presents Cambalache, a group that plays and promotes traditional son jarocho through performance, music workshops, and educational demonstrations.

Homegrown: Mamselle Ruiz

Watch a Homegrown Concert featuring Mamselle Ruiz, a Mexican-born singer and guitarist living in French-speaking Montreal. For her Homegrown concert, Ruiz will concentrate on the traditional side of her repertoire, bringing traditional songs and Son Huasteco standards from several regions of Mexico to the Homegrown at Home series.

Homegrown: harbanger

harbanger is a turntable septet - an experimental hip-hop music research project exploring turntable polyphony and polyrhythm. harbanger will present new music composed by The Don Santos ("Where The Movement Is") and Pryvet Peepsho ("Pavor Nocturnus") in their September 28 video premiere.


September News from the Library of Congress
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News from the Library of Congress

2021 National Book Festival Starts Tomorrow!

National Book Festival header

New Videos from the Library of Congress, September 14
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Open a Book, Open the World: 2021 National Book Festival
Watch the introduction to the 2021 Library of Congress National Book Festival and its exciting lineup of authors, poets and writers in a one-hour special from PBS with hosts LeVar Burton and Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden. This program will offer a timely celebration of the power of books and discussions on some of the big topics of the day.

The 2021 Library of Congress National Book Festival is Sept. 17-26, with live author conversations every day. On Sept. 17 at 10 a.m. ET, 35 video-on-demand programs will become available to watch anytime. This year’s Festival also features interactive presentations with Library of Congress experts, a national television special and related events on PBS, NPR podcasts, and author interviews on Washington Post Live. Check out Festival Near You to discover related events from local organizations.


June News from the Library of Congress
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News from the Library of Congress

Celebrating Pride Month, Juneteenth, Summer Movies and More


Tomorrow: Ritz Chamber Players at the Coolidge Auditorium
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June Line Up: Mivos Quartet, Ritz Players and Ranky Tanky
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Pick of the Week: Tomorrow, Flutronix, In-Person Concert
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Keyword Selected: Cuba

Sudan's military coup and the stifling of speech | The Listening Post
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Sudanas flirtation with democracy ends in a coup daetat - how far will its leaders go to control what we know about the story? Contributors: Mohanad Hashim - journalist Jonas Horner - deputy director, Horn of Africa, Crisis Group Yassmin Abdel-Magied, writer and broadcaster Raga Makawi - editor, Africa Arguments On our radar: As Myanmaras military courts sentence journalists arrested after the coup that removed democratically elected Aung San Suu Kyi, producer Nicholas Muirhead talks Richard Gizbert about the release of American journalist Danny Fenster. Eric Zemmour: The political rise of Franceas far-right polemicist Far-right French journalist Eric Zemmour has yet to declare himself a presidential candidate - but has he already set the tone for next yearas election? Contributors: Rokhaya Diallo - contributor, C8 and The Washington Post newspaper Christophe Deloire - secretary-general, Reporters Without Borders Aurelien Mondon - associate professor of politics, University of Bath

Hate speech and misinformation in Ethiopiaas war | The Listening Post
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As Ethiopia stares down the barrel of all-out civil war, a government-imposed communications blackout is allowing hatred and disinformation to thrive. Contributors: Berhan Taye - Digital researcher Nima Elbagir - Senior international correspondent, CNN Claire Wilmot - Research officer, LSE On our radar: This week, a routine news conference in Athens turned into a shouting match between a Dutch journalist and the Greek prime minister. Meenakshi Ravi tells Richard Gizbert about the media furore that ensued. War and PiS: An attack on Polandas biggest news channel: Back from the brink, still on the air - the Polish 24-hour news channel that remains in the governmentas crosshairs. Contributors: Brygida Grysiak - Deputy editor-in-chief, TVN24 Tomasz Lis - Former anchor, TVN & editor-in-chief, Newsweek Poland ElA1/4bieta Rutkowska - Journalist, Dziennik Gazeta Prawna Beata Tadla - Former anchor, TVP & host, Onet.Pl

Climate crisis: Can journalists make the world care? | The Listening Post
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Climate change: News organisations, fossil fuel companies and audiences all need to do better on the story that could mean the end of us. Contributors: Meera Selva - deputy director of the Reuters Institute Genevieve Guenther - founder and director, End Climate Silence George Monbiot - author and columnist David Gelber - co-founder, The Years Project On our radar: A year after war broke out in the northern Tigray region of Ethiopia, Prime Minister Abiy Ahmedas government has declared a six-month state of emergency. Producer Flo Phillips joins Richard Gizbert to discuss the effect it is having on freedom of expression. The hate crimes going viral in India: Violence against Muslims, filmed by the perpetrators, is the latest ugly trend among Indiaas Hindu vigilantes. Contributors: Alishan Jafri - journalist, The Wire Hate Watch Angana Chatterji - anthropologist, University of California, Berkeley and co-editor of Majoritarian State: How Hindu Nationalism is Changing India Saba Naqvi - author of Shades of Saffron 00:00 Intro 02:15 The climate crisis 11:29 Ethiopiaas ongoing conflict 13:42 Violence against Muslims in India 23:48 End note

Arrests & defamation: Bollywood in the dock in Modias India | The Listening Post
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Aryan Khan, the son of one of Indiaas biggest movie stars, Shah Rukh Khan, was charged with possessing and trafficking drugs. We take a look at the drug bust that tells a story of the conflict between the Indian authorities and Bollywood. Contributors: Namrata Joshi - Journalist and film critic Vivek Agnihotri - Film director Sucharita Tyagi - Film critic Tejaswini Ganti - Assistant Professor, Anthropology and Film Studies, NYU On our radar: Facebook is again in our news feeds, and once again for the wrong reasons. Richard Gizbert speaks to producer Nic Muirhead about the continuing fallout from the whistleblower that has a consortium of news outlets on the companyas case. Alarm Phone: The refugee hotline and lifeline We discuss Alarm Phone, the hotline for refugees at sea that is helping to get their stories heard. Contributors: Jacob Berkson - Activist, Alarm Phone Giorgos Christides - Reporter, Der Spiegel Giorgos Kosmopoulos - Greece researcher, Amnesty International Notis Mitarachi - Greek Minister of Migration and Asylum 00:00 Intro 02:12 Bollywood in the dock in Modias India 11:17 Facebook whistleblower fallout 13:45 Alarm Phone: The refugee hotline & lifeline 24:05 End Note

The Beirut blast probe: A tale of distrust and disinformation | The Listening Post
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Accountability for the blast that destroyed Beirutas port proves elusive in Lebanon and journalists are not helping. Contributors: Lara Bitar - Editor-in-Chief, The Public Source Alia Ibrahim - Co-founder and CEO, Daraj Jad Shahrour - Journalist and writer; Communications Officer, Samir Kassir Foundation On our radar: Obituaries of former United States Secretary of State Colin Powell have been too kind. 'Foreign agents' and 'undesirables': Kremlin's media labels Authorities in Russia have been systematically clamping down on journalism with the help of so-called apatriotica activists. Contributors: Vitaly Borodin - Federal Security & Anti-Corruption Project Roman Badanin - Founder & Former Editor-in-Chief, Proekt; John S. Knight Senior International Fellow, Stanford University Lilia Yapparova - Special Correspondent, Meduza

What this year's Nobel Prize says about the global media climate | The Listening Post
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For the first time in 85 years, the Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to two journalists. What does this tell us about the state of global journalism? Contributors: Rana Ayyub - Journalist Agnes Callamard - Secretary General, Amnesty International Julie Posetti - Global director of research, International Center for Journalists Ilya Yablokov - Lecturer in Journalism and Digital Media, Sheffield University On our radar: Singaporean authorities have passed a new "foreign inference" law that has put journalists there on alert. Richard Gizbert speaks to producer Nic Muirhead about the law and its worrying implications. Just a game?: The US military-gaming complex War is not a game. But it is for the video games industry and it is proving to be a useful ally for the United States military. Contributors: Nick Robinson - Associate Professor of Politics and International Studies, University of Leeds Matthew Gault - Reporter, VICE Rami Ismail - Video game developer

Outages, leaks and bad headlines: Facebook's nightmare week | The Listening Post
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A whistleblower, a system crash and the United States Congress on its case; Facebook goes under the microscope, yet again. Contributors: Pranesh Prakash - Co-founder, Centre for Internet and Society; affiliated fellow, Information Society Project, Yale Law School Siva Vaidhyanathan - Professor, University of Virginia; author, Antisocial Media Marianne Franklin - Professor of global media and politics, Goldsmiths, University of London Mahsa Alimardani - Researcher, Oxford Internet Institute On our radar: The Pandora Papers - the largest investigation in journalism history - are reverberating through the financial world of the rich and powerful. Producer Flo Phillips tells Richard Gizbert about the biggest ever leaks of offshore data and who they have exposed. The case of Egyptas jailed TikTok stars The Egyptian government has been progressively tightening its grip on cyberspace and female social media influencers are the new targets. Contributors: Yasmin Omar - Egypt legal associate, The Tahrir Institute for Middle East Policy; human rights lawyer Joey Shea - Non-resident scholar, Middle East Institute Dalia Fahmy - Associate professor, Long Island University, Brooklyn

Kidnap or Kill: The CIAas plot against WikiLeaksa Julian Assange | The Listening Post
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An exposA(c) detailing the CIAas war on WikiLeaks - a Trump administration plan to silence Julian Assange and the organisation - has been published. But like so much of the Assange story, it's got nothing like the media coverage it deserves. Contributors: Michael Isikoff - Chief investigative correspondent, Yahoo News Kevin Gosztola - Managing editor, Shadowproof.com Carrie DeCell - Staff attorney, Knight First Amendment Institute Rebecca Vincent - Director of international campaigns & UK bureau director, Reporters Without Borders On our radar: Project Amplify - Facebookas PR initiative - backfires. Richard Gizbert speaks to producer Meenakshi Ravi about the scrutiny Facebook is under, yet again. Lost in translation: How texts change as they travel The translation of literature - from one language to another - is a tricky business. Translators become cultural mediators, balancing faithfulness to the original with the needs of a new audience. When translators fail, context can be sacrificed, and stereotypes can get reinforced. Contributors: Layla AlAmmar - Author, Silence is a Sense & Academic, University of Lancaster Susan Bassnett - Translation theorist & emeritus professor, University of Warwick Muhammad Ali Mojaradi - Translator & founder, @persianpoetics Leri Price - Literary translator End Note: And, after 16 years of leading the country as its chancellor, Germany is saying goodbye to Angela Merkel. Puppet Regime - a comedy series produced and published by GZERO Media - pays tribute to her work, Kraftwerk style.

Drone exposA(c): The journalism that forced the Pentagonas mea culpa | The Listening Post
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United States drone warfare is finally being exposed. But why did it take American news outlets so long to get to such a big story? Contributors: Emran Feroz, Founder, Drone Memorial Christine Fair, Security Studies Program, Georgetown University Spencer Ackerman, Author, Reign of Terror Vanessa Gezari, National Security Editor, The Intercept On our radar: Producer Tariq Nafi and host Richard Gizbert discuss a voting app that was developed by Russian opposition activists to fight Vladimir Putin in the recent elections - but was censored by Big Tech. 100 Years Too Late: Canadaas Residential School Reckoning Months after the story of mass graves at so-called residential schools in Cananda broke, the nation is still reckoning with the trauma of mass graves. Contributors: Cheryl McKenzie, Director of News and Current Affairs, Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN) Cindy Blackstock, Executive Director, First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada Connie Walker, Host, Stolen: The Search for Jermain Wab Kinew, Leader, Manitoba New Democratic Party

China: Regulating superstars, superfans and big tech | The Listening Post
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Xi Jinping's China has embarked on a campaign that could transform the country's technology, entertainment and media industries. Contributors: Chris Buckley - China correspondent, The New York Times Kaiser Kuo - Host, The Sinica Podcast and editor-at-large, SupChina Bingchun Meng - Associate professor, Department of Media and Communications, LSE Rui Zhong - Program associate, Wilson Center, Kissinger Institute on China and the United States On our radar A month of Taliban rule in Afghanistan, Meenakshi Ravi and producer Johanna Hoes discuss how the Taliban is already leaving its mark on the countryas news industry despite initial promises to the contrary. Structures of oppression? Colombiaas falling statues Indigenous Colombians have been toppling statues of European colonisers - challenging how the countryas history is remembered. Contributors: Didier Chirimuscay - Misak community leader Rodolfo Segovia - President, Colombian Academy of History Amada Carolina Perez - Historian, Javeriana University

Reporting the aenda of the Afghan war 20 years after 9/11 | The Listening Post
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Two decades on from the 9/11 attacks, American news coverage of the United States' withdrawal from Afghanistan reveals how much has changed - and how much has not - in the mediaas approach to US wars. Contributors: Alexander Hainy-Khaleeli - Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies, University of Exeter Catherine Lutz - co-director, Costs of War project; professor of International Studies, Brown University Fariba Nawa - author, Opium Nation; host, On Spec Azmat Khan - contributing writer, The New York Times Magazine; assistant professor, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism On our radar: Meenakshi Ravi speaks to producer Flo Phillips about the latest developments in the Afghan media space, including the Talibanas mistreatment of journalists covering this weekas protests. Afghan journalists under threat A report on the past, present and future of the media in Afghanistan, as told by three Afghan journalists. Contributors: aNa - Journalist & media safety specialist aMa - Photojournalist aLa - Regional radio & TV reporter

The Forever War: 20 Years After 9/11 | The Listening Post
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Twenty years after the 9/11 attacks, this special edition of The Listening Post looks at the climate of fear that undergirded the so-called "War on Terror" and how the US news and entertainment industries helped produce it. Contributors: - Chris Hedges - Former foreign correspondent for The New York Times; author of Collateral Damage - Sinan Antoon - Co-editor at Jadaliyya; poet and writer; associate professor at New York University - Jill Abramson - Former executive editor of The New York Times - Deepa Kumar - author of Islamophobia and the Politics of Empire; associate professor at Rutgers University - Robert D Kaplan - Former contributing editor at The Atlantic - Lexi Alexander - Movie and TV director

Pegasus: Flying on the wings of Israeli acyber-tech diplomacya? | The Listening Post
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A global cyber-surveillance scandal - spyware developed in Israel - has put the government there under the media microscope, and its story does not add up. Contributors: Jonathan Klinger - Cyberlaw lawyer Marc Owen Jones - Assistant professor, Hamid Bin Khalifa University Omer Benjakub - Tech & Cyber Reporter, Haaretz Marwa Fatafta - Policy Analyst, Al Shabaka On our radar: Tunisia is in political turmoil after the president declared a state of emergency - or what critics are calling a coup. Richard Gizbert speaks to producer Flo Phillips about how journalists there are feeling the heat. Africaas PR Push: How governments manage the message: Handling public relations for governments is lucrative work - and for Western PR firms, Africa has emerged as a new hunting ground. Contributors: Alex Magaisa - Former adviser, prime minister of Zimbabwe Alexander Dukalskis - Author, Making the World Safe for Dictatorship Kathleen Ndongmo - Communications specialist

Pegasus Project: Malware used against journalists and dissidents | The Listening Post
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A global consortium of media outlets blew the lid off a huge surveillance scandal revealing how the hacking tool Pegasus has been used by governments around the world to spy on dissidents and journalists via their mobile phones. Contributors: Rohini Singh - Reporter, The Wire Bradley Hope - Co-founder, Project Brazen Laurent Richard - Founder, Forbidden Stories Eva Galperin - Director, Electronic Frontier Foundation On our radar: American media outlets have been feasting on a story a the billionaire space race. Richard Gizbert and producer Meenakshi Ravi discuss how the mass of coverage squares alongside another story about the planet that is far more consequential - climate change. Bild's battle for political influence in Germany There is a crucial election coming in Germany, and its biggest tabloid, Bild, is trying to preserve its place at the heart of German politics. Contributors: Julian Reichelt - Editor-in-chief, Bild GA1/4nter Wallraff - Investigative journalist & author, The Lead Moritz Tschermak - Editor-in-chief, BILDblog & author, How Bild divides society with fear and hate Margreth LA1/4nenborg - Professor of journalism, Free University Berlin - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

Cuba: Protesters move from social media to the streets | The Listening Post
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Cuba is witnessing something historic - the biggest anti-government demonstrations in 60 years - and the authorities have imposed temporary blocks on the internet, making credible media coverage and reliable information that much harder to find. Contributors: MA3nica Rivero Cabrera - Cuban journalist Tracey Eaton - Cuba Money Project Angelo R Guisado - Center for Constitutional Rights JosA(c) JasA!n Nieves - Editor-in-chief, El Toque On our radar: Whether they are taking penalty kicks or taking a knee, Black footballers playing for England are dealing with online abuse. Richard Gizbert and producer Tariq Nafi discuss the debate that has resulted - about racism in the United Kingdom. Sports activism in the era of social media On tennis and basketball courts, baseball fields and in hockey rinks, athletes are putting their political and social activism out there for sports fans to see. Contributors: Shireen Ahmed - Journalist & writer Musa Okwonga - Co-founder, Stadio Football & author, One of Them Frank Guridy - Associate professor, Columbia University Khalida Popal - Former captain, Afghanistanas womenas football team

Hong Kong: Broken promises | The Listening Post
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Twenty-four years since Britain handed Hong Kong back to China, the city has undergone a transformation. In recent years, Beijing has intensified the silencing of political dissent and the squeezing of media freedom - through new laws drawn up in the name of security, the jailing of critics, and the reigning in of adversarial journalism. Contributors: Chris Yeung - Chairperson, Hong Kong Journalists Association Bao Choy - Freelance journalist, RTHK Linda Wong - Journalist, Citizen News Keith Richburg - Journalism and Media Studies Centre, Hong Kong University; president, Foreign Correspondents Club Holden Chow - Vice chairman, Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong Hong Kong: The assault on free speech Three Hong Kongers talk about the shrinking space for freedom in their city, and the way it has affected their lives and work. Contributors: Lee Cheuk-yan - Founder, June 4th Museum Wong Kei Kwan (Zunzi) - Political cartoonist Nathan Law - Democracy activist - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

Iranas new president: What's next for the countryas media? | The Listening Post
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Iranas new president-elect is heading into the job carrying some baggage from the past that neither he nor the countryas state-friendly news outlets care to talk about. Contributors: Mahsa Alimardani - Iran researcher, Article 19; researcher, Oxford Internet Institute Ghanbar Naderi - Iranian affairs analyst Pardis Shafafi - Anthropologist and researcher, ERC Off-Site Project Arash Azizi - Author of Shadow Commander On our radar Richard Gizbert speaks to producer Meenakshi Ravi about the targeting of female social media influencers in Egypt as two more women are jailed for their TikTok videos. The struggle for freedom of expression in post-Castro Cuba From protests to viral videos, Cuban activists test the limits of dissent as they demand greater cultural freedoms. Contributors: Amaury Pacheco - Poet and activist, Movimiento San Isidro Fernando Ravsberg - Journalist; former correspondent, BBC Fernando Rojas - Cuban Deputy Minister of Culture Marta Maria Ramirez - Independent journalist - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

Nigeria: The tweet that got Twitter banned | The Listening Post
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The tit-for-tat in Nigeria that saw Twitter banned by the government. Contributors: Mercy Abang - Journalist Lai Mohammed - Nigerian minister for information and culture Gbenga Sesan - Executive director, Paradigm Initiative Fisayo Soyombo - Editor-in-chief, Foundation for Investigative Journalism On our radar It's election time in Algeria and the government is feeling the heat on the streets. Richard Gizbert and producer Flo Phillips discuss its response - arresting journalists, and taking broadcasters off the air. A snapshot of empire: The racist legacy of colonial postcards How the golden age of postcards left behind a legacy of racism that continues to shape perceptions of Africans today. Contributors: Sarah Sentilles - Writer and critical theorist Olubukola Gbadegesin - Associate professor, Saint Louis University Stephen Hughes - Senior lecturer, SOAS Julie Crooks - Curator, Art Gallery of Ontario - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

From Sheikh Jarrah to Gaza: Journalism under apartheid | The Listening Post
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Just days after the ceasefire in Gaza ended 11 days of bombing, The Listening Post spoke with two Palestinians who have tilted international attention towards their struggle. Contributors: Muna al-Kurd - Sheikh Jarrah resident and activist Hosam Salem - Gaza Palestinian photographer On our radar Richard Gizbert and producer Tariq Nafi discuss Israelas crackdown on reporters in East Jerusalem, and the international journalists calling out their own media operations for sanitising the oppression of Palestinians. How to cover apartheid: A human rights perspective with Hagai El-Ad Human rights groups are reframing the discussion about Israel's domination of Palestinians. Richard Gizbert interviews Hagai El-Ad, executive director of Israeli human rights organisation, BaTselem. Contributors: Hagai El-Ad - Executive director, BaTselem - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

Lab leak reloaded: The media brings back COVID origin debate | The Listening Post
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A year and a half into the pandemic and people are still asking where the COVID-19 virus originated. The so-called lab-leak theory is gaining momentum among some scientists and journalists who contend this story has the makings of a mass cover-up. Contributors: Nicholas Wade - Former science reporter, New York Times James Palmer - Deputy editor, Foreign Policy Amy Maxmen - Senior reporter, Nature Gideon Meyerowitz-Katz - Epidemiologist, University of Wollongong; columnist, The Guardian On our radar One journalist in Pakistan is beaten up. Another is being censored. Richard Gizbert speaks to producer Tariq Nafi about the countryas red lines that you cannot cross. Forced to forget, determined to remember: The Tiananmen massacre Chinese officials have tried to erase the Tiananmen Square massacre from the countryas history but dissidents outside the mainland are doing what they can to keep the memory alive. Contributors: Lee Cheuk-yan - Founder, June 4th Museum; chairman, Hong Kong Alliance Wuaer Kaixi - Tiananmen protest leader Yaqiu Wang - China researcher, Human Rights Watch

Israel-Palestine: The double standard in American newsrooms | The Listening Post
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News coverage in the US of the Palestine-Israel conflict has always favoured Israel but that is beginning to shift. The question is - to what extent and will it last? Contributors: Linda Sarsour - Executive director, MPower Change; Author, We Are Not Here to be Bystanders Omar Baddar - National Policy Council, Arab-American Institute Lara Friedman - President, Foundation for Middle East Peace Philip Weiss - Founder and senior editor, Mondoweiss On our radar Belarusian authorities went to extreme lengths to arrest opposition journalist Roman Protasevich. Richard Gizbert speaks to producer Meenakshi Ravi to find out why. Slovenia: The prime ministeras awar with the mediaa Another European leader shows his authoritarian side; Sloveniaas prime minister, Janez JanA!a, says he is at "war with the media". Contributors: Marko MilosavljeviA - University of Ljubljana, Chair of Journalism AnuA!ka DeliA - Editor-in-chief, OA!tro BlaA3/4 Zgaga - Reporter, Nacional.hr and investigative journalist Boris TomaA!iA - Host and chief editor, Nova 24 - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

Deadly Games: Algeria and Tunisia's ultra football fans | Al Jazeera World
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"Somebody said that footballas a matter of life and death to you. I said, listen, it's more important than that." When the legendary Liverpool football manager Bill Shankly came out with his now-famous quote on TV in 1981, he might have been talking about the Algerian and Tunisian fans in this documentary. For many, football really is much more than a game. Some see themselves as not just supporters but part of a wider movement. They say that on the terraces, they find a sense of belonging and a camaraderie otherwise absent from their daily lives and that as supporters they also represent the dispossessed of the poor suburbs of Tunis and Algiers. Sometimes, however, football passions can have life-changing consequences. In March 2018, 19-year-old Omar Labidi from the southern suburbs of Tunis clashed with police outside a busy stadium. The victimas brother claims that police used tear gas to force Omar into a nearby river where he drowned. Three years after his death, his family continues to seek justice. In Algeria, Raouf Zerka has only vague memories of the game that changed his life in November 2016. In the 70th minute of a local derby match in Algiers, a burning flare hit him in the face. After eight days in a coma, he discovered he had lost his left eye. This film follows Tunisiaas and Algeriaas most passionate fans, buying tickets on the black market, travelling vast distances to away matches, and doing whatever it takes to support the teams they love. But it also highlights the price of football passion and asks if the cost of extreme fandoms is worth the risk.

Incite and inflame: Israelas manipulation of the media | The Listening Post
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Ceasefire in Gaza: As journalists in the Strip stop to catch their breath, Israel's media stand accused of inciting violence against Palestinians. Contributors: Yara Hawari - Academic and writer; senior analyst, Al Shabaka Tareq Baconi - Senior analyst, International Crisis Group Joshua Leifer - Assistant editor, Jewish Currents Rami Younis - Palestinian journalist On our radar In Qatar, a Kenyan who blogged under the pen name "Noah" about his life as a migrant worker in the Arab Gulf state finds himself in custody. Richard Gizbert and producer Johanna Hoes discuss the case of Malcolm Bidali. The Xinjiang whitewash Meet the white Western influencers helping China contest claims of genocide in Xinjiang. Contributors: Mareike Ohlberg - Senior fellow (Asia Program), German Marshall Fund Sophie Richardson - China director, Human Rights Watch Amelia Pang - Author of Made in China Shelley Zhang - Writer, China Uncensored

#Palestine: Videos of violence, images of death on social media
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Gaza under assault. Bloodshed at the Al-Aqsa Mosque. Social media is the place to go for the coverage of this story except when the platforms take issue with what is being posted. Contributors: Marwa Fatafta - Policy analyst, Al-Shabaka Yossi Mekelberg - Associate fellow of the MENA Programme, Chatham House Mariam Barghouti - Writer and activist Rami Khouri - Professor of journalism, American University of Beirut On our radar Three Myanmar journalists have been arrested in Thailand. Richard Gizbert speaks to producer Flo Phillips about their possible deportation back into the hands of Myanmaras military government. Mammy, Jezebel, Sapphire: Stereotyping Black women in media We discuss the stereotyping of Black women in the media and the push for change in an industry where diversity and inclusion have been too long in coming. Contributors: Kovie Biakolo - Culture writer and multiculturalism scholar Francesca Sobande - Lecturer of digital media studies, Cardiff University Naeemah Clark - Professor of cinema and television arts, Elon University; author, Diversity in US Mass Media Babirye Bukilwa - Actor and playwright - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

'Foreign agents and extremists': Russia's attack on critics | The Listening Post
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In Russia, the political stakes are rising in the run up to election season - journalists are being branded as "foreign agents" and an opposition figure is labelled an "extremist". Contributors: Ilya Yablokov - Academic, Leeds University Lisa Alexandrova-Zorina - Journalist, Team 29 Ivan Kolpakov - Editor-in-chief, Meduza Uliana Pavlova - Journalist, Moscow Times On our radar After months of deliberation Donald Trumpas Facebook account remains suspended. Richard Gizbert asks producer Meenakshi Ravi to explain the decision. The Turks turning to YouTube Independent journalists in Turkey, like CA1/4neyt Azdemir, are taking refuge online. Azdemiras daily YouTube program has become a staple for Turks, especially among younger viewers looking for journalism of a different kind. Contributors: CA1/4neyt Azdemir - Creator and host, CA1/4neyt Azdemir Show Cansu Aamlibel - Editor-in-chief, Duvar English Emre Kizilkaya - Turkish vice chair, International Press Institute; author, The New Mainstream Media is Rising - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

India: Smothering critique amidst the second COVID wave | The Listening Post
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While Indiaas healthcare system lies in total collapse, the government is leaning on social media companies to protect its own image. Contributors: Vineet Kumar - Author and media scholar Pratik Sinha - Co-founder, Alt News Pragya Tiwari - Political and cultural commentator Sangeeta Mahapatra - German Institute for Global and Area Studies On our radar Having imprisoned leading opposition figure Alexey Navalny, Russian authorities are now looking to put his entire organisation out of business. Producer Johanna Hoes tells Richard Gizbert why the group is being targeted by the state. Paul Rusesabagina: The trial of the 'hero of Hotel Rwanda' Dissident or "terrorist"? The many-sided story of hotel manager turned Hollywood hero, Paul Rusesabagina. Contributors: Michela Wrong - Author, Do Not Disturb Gatete Nyiringabo Ruhumuliza - Political analyst Tom Ndahiro - Genocide scholar Terry George - Director, Hotel Rwanda - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

Indiaas COVID crisis: Navigating bad stats and government spin | The Listening Post
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COVID-19 has brought India to its knees and, in many ways, the mainstream news media are failing to do their job. Contributors: Atul Chaurasia - Executive Editor, Newslaundry Paranjoy Guha Thakurta - Journalist & Author Sandhya Ravishankar - Journalist, India Ahead News Kapil Komireddi - Author, Malevolent Republic On our radar Host Richard Gizbert speaks to producer Flo Phillips about doctored footage coming out of Russia. Kremlin-backed channels would have you believe it is not just Ukrainian and Russian forces building up at the border but American as well. Attacked on the streets, typecast on TV: a media history of being Asian in America How Asian Americans have been othered in the media; the tropes and the rise in hate. Contributors: Kimmy Yam - Reporter, NBC News Takeo Rivera - Assistant Professor, Boston University Amanda Nguyen - Civil Rights Activist & Founder, Rise

Brazil: Battling Bolsonaroas COVID misinformation | The Listening Post
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Some of Brazilas biggest media companies have come together to combat COVID-19 misinformation a a lot of which is coming from President Jair Bolsonaroas office. Contributors: Luciana Coelho - Head of COVID task force, Folha de Sao Paulo Cristina TardA!guila - Associate director, Poynter Laura GuimarAPSes CorrAaa - Associate professor, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais Marcelo Lins - Journalist, GloboNews On our radar Nicholas Muirhead and Richard Gizbert discuss a curious case of photo colourisation (and distortion) that has landed American media outlet Vice in hot water. Wikipedia: The internetas unlikeliest experiment turns 20 How has a free online encyclopedia built through crowdsourcing, open editing and volunteers managed to maintain its relevance and preserve its credibility? We look at what makes Wikipedia tick. Contributors: Katherine Maher - CEO, Wikimedia Foundation Sandister Tei - Co-founder, Wikimedia Ghana User Group Shane Greenstein - Professor, Harvard Business School

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